A Device for Increasing Efficiency of Rat and Mouse Tattooing

H Yacowitz, BA Piscitelli, A Yacowitz 
Research and Development Laboratory, AIMS, Inc., Piscataway, NJ 08854

Permanent and humane identification of laboratory animals from day-old to maturity is being done at many laboratories using tail, ear, or body tattoos employing AIMS™ black pigment #242. In conducting large studies, speed of tattooing is an important factor. Tattooing usually involves dipping the tattoo needle into pigment before application to the skin. To improve tattooing speed, a microperistaltic pump was employed to deliver pigment via flexible plastic tubing to a stainless steel cylinder soldered on the tattoo needle. The pump was activated with a foot switch which also started the tattoo equipment. Separate rheostats regulated the speed of the pump and tattooing unit. Using this device, pigment flowed into the tattoo in microliter quantities as the needle penetrated the skin. In rats and mice the tattoos were darker than those obtained with the dipping procedure, since the tattoo site was saturated with pigment. Tattooing speed increased 20 to 50%, depending on the tattooist and the number of digits applied to the tail. The more digits, the greater improvement obtained in tattooing speed. More rapid tattooing reduced time involved in restraint and minimized animal stress. The pigment delivery device and modified needle improved efficiency of tattooing.

PUBLISHED IN ABSTRACTS OF SCIENTIFIC PAPERS 
43RD ANNUAL AALAS MEETING, ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA NOV. 1992

CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE 
VOL. 31 NO.4 P. 41, JULY 1992

Category: 

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